Posts Tagged ‘espana’

Marcelino

The title may be out of Real Madrid’s distance and, while Atlético Madrid’s win over them may have lodged a significant distance between 2nd and 3rd, they are still in the top 3. Typically in Spain, there is quite a significant cushion between 3rd and 4th but this season has debunked that. Real Madrid, instead of meandering in 3rd place, now have to look over their shoulders because Villarreal are breathing heavily down their necks.

Marcelino’s men appear to improve with every passing season. It’s almost as though, by stripping them of their star players, they improve as a collective. This year, there is no outright gem. Everybody is contributing as the Yellow Submarine attack and defend as one cohesive unit. Their successes are attributed more to resilience and unity than individual talent or a purple patch of form. This is reinforced by their defensive record: a mere 18 league goals conceded in 26 games. That statistic has contributed to 14 clean-sheets for the season, including five on the trot. Only Atléti have conceded less goals than them, yet Los Colchoneros failed to register even one goal against Villarreal this season. Whereas last season they had the brilliance of Luciano Vietto and Gerard Moreno scoring heaps, they’ve traded that in for a more complete squad that recognises its limitations and does not attempt to play a brand of football that simply does not suit them. And this is why they’re on the verge of clipping Real Madrid’s heels.

Real Madrid last finished 4th 12 years ago; that side that finished 4th in 2004 had Zidane operating in midfield. While this season’s inconsistencies and poor results cannot be solely blamed on the man, it is ironic that the campaign could end with him at the forefront of another 4th placed finish. Because as much as Real Madrid have raucously tumbled this season, Villarreal have quietly climbed the table. That facet of their season is a strong reason as to why Villarreal could very well pip Real Madrid to automatic Champions League qualification. When the two sides meet on April 20th – European schedules permitting – it could be that Real Madrid are the team behind Villarreal. That is more a testament to Villarreal’s undeniable consistency this season than Real Madrid’s chaotic dip.

 

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Gameiro celebrates his goal against Molde in the Europa / [Image via Manuel Gomez]

As Kevin Gameiro’s low-shot nestled into the net against Molde, he became the highest goal scorer of all-time for manager Unai Emery, beating out Carlos Bacca and Alváro Negredo in the process. But not only did that goal make him Emery’s highest goal scorer of all-time, it counted for his 19th of the season in all competitions – two more than he amassed over the entirety of last season. The French striker is currently in his finest vein of form, but that wasn’t always the case at Sevilla.

When Gameiro joined Sevilla, his job was to play second fiddle to Bacca. Whether it be operating with the Colombian just to open up space for him, or entering the field of play with 15 minutes to go, it’s fair to say that Gameiro was severely underused and under-appreciated by Sevilla for a long while. He would often narrow their style of play and tread on Bacca’s toes. His game was made up of uncertainty both in movement and in finishing. It would take the 28-year-old several chances before he would bury one. The culmination of the aforementioned drawbacks meant that Gameiro quickly became someone who played in dead-rubber games or when fixtures became congested.

Bacca’s departure may have worried a multitude of Sevilla fans, but it eased the pressure off Gameiro’s shoulders and allowed him to spearhead an attack consistently. When Fernando Llorente arrived on a free transfer from Juventus, there was a small concern that Gameiro would once again find himself on the periphery of the starting 11. In short, that would eventually become something far from the truth.

The French forward appears to have something that the Spanish tend to call autocrítica, which is when you look at yourself in a critical manner and evaluate your weaknesses in order to erase or strengthen them. This is evident in Gameiro’s case because he plays like a changed, more improved player. Whereas before he was treading on the toes of his teammates, he now knows when and where to exploit space. His spacial awareness has increased which, in turn, is reflected in his goal tally this season. Most of his goals have come from supreme movement and commanding of the box.

Something that Bacca improved on when he was at Sevilla was his passing and associative play. A criticism of his was that he often looked for a pass to reach him, rather than go looking for it or involving others. When he altered that negative facet of his game, his popularity in European football rose, granting him a lucrative move to AC Milan. In Gameiro’s case, things are very similar. Gameiro now glides around the final third, looking to receive a pass, and release one of his own, or exploit defensive gaps. In fact, his three league assists were created from navigating of space on his own behalf and inch-perfect passes. By becoming a more well-rounded forward less obsessed with scoring goals, he has found that goal scoring is far more natural when you involve yourself in the bulk of play rather than waiting for scraps. By being on the move more often, Gameiro has scored more goals in a Sevilla shirt than he could have ever predicted.

With the Europa League, Copa del Rey and league still to play for, it wouldn’t be farfetched to predict 25 goals (or more) from the Frenchman this season. 29 goals in all competitions would be a return higher than what Bacca ever produced for Sevilla. To think there was a point where the quality of the two could not have been further apart is astounding and outright banal.

Bacca Gam

With Karim Benzema’s national team future facing uncertainty, Didier Deschamps simply cannot afford to ignore Gameiro’s form and improvement as a footballer. He is no longer a player who solely scores goals. He improves and heightens the quality of his team’s play in the final third more so than Olivier Giroud or any other French forward currently active. Antoine Griezmann is his real competition, but that centre-forward role is more of a necessity at Atlético Madrid rather than an indication of where Griezmann’s future for France lies. Therefore, it is inconceivable to even ponder on Gameiro not making that flight for the European Championships. He is the most improved, most productive and hungriest natural centre-forward available to France if Benzema is excluded from the tournament. In fact, aside from Benzema, no other French centre-forward has scored more goals than Gameiro (in club competitions) this season. If France want a footballer who liquifies play in the final third and remains productive, then they must look no further than the 28-year-old. Especially if he ends the season the way everybody is predicting he will.

Gameiro has gone from being an inconsistent, enigmatic striker at Sevilla to a dependable fan favourite. That renaissance is solely down to his own mentality, deciding to improve himself rather than sulk on the bench and accept a bit-part role for the remainder of his contract.

Many will be familiar with the name Víctor Sánchez. After all, he was part of that golden generation of Deportivo players that won the Copa del Rey in 2002 at the Bernabeu. He may not be remembered for the flair of Djalminha or creativity of Juan Carlos Valerón, but he was the guy who would bust a lung to dominate the wings and always sustained a high level of productivity. Today, at the age of 39, he is the manager of the club in question: Dépor.

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Víctor lifting the Copa del Rey in 2002

Víctor returned to A Coruña on the 9th of April with the club in the relegation zone, having just sacked the underachieving Victor Fernandez. Dépor were in a rut, struggling to get points and failing to operate as a cohesive unit. Individualism was valued over unity and it was a major component of the club’s unsuccessful return to La Liga.

Víctor’s job was tough: keep Dépor in the top flight with only eight games to go. In those eight games, there were three prestigious opponents: Athletic Bilbao, Atlético Madrid and Barcelona. His only loss in those three games came against Atléti, with two draws in the others to keep Dépor in La Liga. The final game, in fact, was away at Barcelona. Los Blanquiazules were 2-0 down at half-time… 2-0 down with 23 minutes to go. Fast-forward to the final whistle and Dépor were celebrating on the Camp Nou pitch. Lucas Pérez and Salomão scored in the final 20 minutes to turn the game on its head and keep Los Blanquiazules in the Spanish Primera. It was a game of pure ecstasy, but Víctor was the puppeteer.

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Lucas and Víctor embrace at the full-time whistle

The 39-year-old’s arrival filled everyone with hope – from the fans, right down to the players. It was his first job as a manager and his hunger was clear to see. He immediately instilled a sense of belief in the changing rooms and the turnaround in performance levels was staggering. Take Salomão, the scorer of the goal that kept Dépor in the top flight, for example: he had barely featured all season, with the previous manager discarding him from the squad due to personal disagreements. He had no reason to play with such heart, desire and tenacity, but Víctor awoke those traits from within him and exploited them to turn the club’s fortunes around. It is those minute details that help define a coach, and that is precisely why he is being heralded as the brightest young manager in the country. To undergo your first job with heaps of pressure and come out of the other end unscathed and adored is undeniably impressive.

In the summer, Víctor worked closely with club president Tino Fernandez. The idea was to avoid making the same mistakes as in previous years: purchasing washed up journeymen and exhausting a partnership with super agent Jorge Mendes. The club wanted a fresh recruitment policy and the 39-year-old delivered just that. He went out of his way to bring Lucas Pérez back to A Coruña after a flawless loan spell – the striker needed little persuading, having grown up in the city as a supporter of the club. He made the decision to pick up some of the better, discarded players in Spain rather than going abroad for relative unknowns on the cheap. Thus Fernando Navarro, Fayçal Fajr, Pedro Mosquera, Alejandro Arribas, Cani, Fede Cartabia and Luis Alberto. These were players available on a free or happy to move on loan – their one thing in common? They all play in Spain. Víctor wisely opted for the more secure choices that would instill stability and immediate results to a Dépor devoid of that. His final signings: Borges, Riera, Sidnei and Juanfran were all returning to the club after loan spells the season prior. Jonathan Rodriguez and Jonas Gutierrez were the black sheep, arriving from Portugal and England respectively. The entire squad, bar Lucas, was assembled for zilch – with this crop of players, Víctor has taken the Galician club to unfathomable heights.

This season, Víctor has proceeded to amplify the quality of every single player in the side; he squeezes 15% more out of each individual. Moroccan midfielder Fajr was a fairly good – bordering on mediocre – player reaching his late 20s at Elche. Under the Spanish coach, he is now #9 in the list for chances created in La Liga. Furthermore, he has been capped by the Moroccan national team for the first time due to his outstanding club performances.

If our focus shifts to Mosquera, the same has occurred. He was a good defensive-midfielder at Elche, having failed to make an impact at Real Madrid, but now he is widely regarded as one of the best defensive-midfielders in Spain. He is constantly battling for possession, providing cover for his defence while also mixing it up with his passing to create chances. He has become integral to the way Dépor operate as a unit.

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Mosquera on presentation day

Lastly, and while there are other examples, none shines brightest than the Lucas one. Lucas was great in the 14/15 season, scoring some important goals amidst battling with recurring injuries. He scored six all season. As of now, he has 11 league goals in 15 games; his name is being widespread and campaigned in favour of a Spain cap & a trip to France for the 2016 European Championships.

All three of the aforementioned players are 27 years of age and were largely unknown on a grand scale up until this season. Víctor has catapulted them to humble stardom where they now transcend the opinions of their fan base and are widely accepted to be fantastic footballers.

It isn’t just his man-management or astute transfer policy that has helped him succeed. No, it is also down to his tactical flexibility. Víctor toys with different formations and player roles to exploit an opponent’s weakness pre-game and even during it. He started the 2015/16 season with an explosive attacking side that was scoring regularly and playing with no fear away from home. Yet in those extremely tough fixtures, the Spaniard shakes things up and plays with four full-backs to nullify the opposition’s overload on the flanks. It forces teams to move to the centre – where Dépor defend at their best with Mosquera, Sidnei and Arribas gobbling up possession regularly.

Víctor’s most impressive trait is the manner in which he meticulously analyses the opposition. Not only in-game, where he regularly adapts to the rival’s moves, but pre-game too. In fact, that is where he shines brightest. For the goalkeepers, he makes them watch the previous game of the upcoming opponent to see how they were shooting and from where. By doing this, it increases the goalkeeper’s awareness and gives him an edge over the rival players. It was successful most recently when Dépor triumphed in the Galician derby, with Germán Lux stopping Nolito’s penalty and his trademark technique of cutting inside and curling shots.

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Lux celebrates stopping Nolito’s penalty

With the strikers, he trains them all together and has them playing in different combinations to exploit an opposition’s weakness. Lucas is always the mainstay, boasting the ability to drop deep and carry the ball forward with blistering pace and technique. His partner differs from the towering Riera to the rapid and diminutive Jonathan. If he expects the opposition to deploy a high-line, he assembles Lucas and Jonathan together. If he is expecting a more combative game, then Riera joins Lucas to impose his physicality over the opposition’s defence.

Some managers attempt combinations, but fail to analyse the opposition’s recent games in-depth to truly determine how they will operate. Víctor’s attention to detail intertwines with a willingness to succeed and that is the key component to Dépor’s revival this season.

As of now, Víctor has undergone 26 games at Dépor losing a mere four times. He has won eight and drawn 14 – some of which have been against the more bigger clubs in the country: Atlético, Barcelona (twice), Valencia, Sevilla and Athletic (twice). When he returned to A Coruña he said, “This is a club that has suffered a lot. I want to bring hope back to Dépor.” He has done just that, and then some. Not only has he upped the belief and faith of everyone at the club, but he has allowed the entire city to dream of bigger and better things. For once, the dark cloud that has surrounded the club for the last seven years is beginning to disperse into sunlight.

Expect to hear the name ‘Víctor Sánchez’ roll off the tongue of many in the coming years from all corners of the footballing world. His ceiling is impossible to predict and he boasts the greatest of tools to succeed in the game. An adaptable, tactically savvy man-manager that can mastermind positive results with his impressive attention to detail, the sky really is the limit for the young Spaniard.

 

 

If you are looking for answers regarding Fernando Vazquez’s managerial credentials, you might as well close this article because none of that will be provided. I am attempting to make sense of Fernando Vazquez as a manager, including his sometimes head-scratching tactics. Sometimes things aren’t always rosy when you are sitting at the top of the league table by five clear points.

Vazquez smiles, some fans frown.

Vazquez smiles, some fans frown

When listening to Vazquez every week, and then watching his side execute the plans set out for them, it is clear to see that there is no real brand of football at the Riazor. Whilst this is all fine and dandy when you are playing in the second tier of Spanish football, it is sometimes scary for the fans who have seen their side go from masterminding one of the greatest Champions League nights of all-time – beating Ancelotti’s AC Milan 4-0 – to now scrapping with clubs such as Real Jaen, Barcelona B and so on.

Over the summer, due to reasons beyond his power, Vazquez saw many of his players leave due to financial restrictions and the end of loan moves. This meant that Vazquez had to operate with an extremely thin squad, devoid of quality and with a need to dip into the youth system. Vazquez promised a breath of fresh air with the Cantera (academy) players getting a lot of first-team football. Of the five players Vazquez mentioned, only one has really broken into the first-team and, at that, is arguably the most consistent player in the side – Pablo Insua. This was the beginning of the strange case of Fernando Vazquez and, since then, we have seen him toy with ideas and fail to execute them. It is almost as if he poses himself some challenges and questions, yet aborts them to play on the safer side. Whilst some, myself included, have berated him this season for performances lacking identity and clarity, it is hard to malign a manager who has his side sitting top of the second division by five clear points when, at the start of the season, many would have settle for a mid-table or play-off push (for the ambitious).

The brightest gem from the cantera, Bicho, who receives orders from Vazquez

The brightest gem from the cantera, Bicho, who receives orders from Vazquez

After talking to many Deportivo fans regarding Fernando Vazquez, it seems as though everyone agrees on the same thing: he needs to stop making negative substitutions. Deportivo will be controlling the game by one goal with 30 minutes to go and Vazquez will remove an attacker for a heavily defensive-minded player, usually switching the formation to a five-man defence. What this usually does is swing the pendulum in the opposition’s favour as they begin to hit Deportivo with a flurry of attacks. If the game is being controlled and the side look like being able to kill it off, there is no need to opt for a defensive style of play. Whilst some, looking from the outside, may see this as Vazquez being cautious and defending the lead, it often puts Deportivo in a precarious position. Against Tenerife, a couple of games ago, Deportivo were controlling the game after finding themselves a goal up for a good 60 minutes. Despite getting closer to scoring, Vazquez removed Juan Carlos, an attacking midfielder who had been creating chances, and replaced him with central defender Carlos Marchena. The side reverted to a five man defence and, a minute later, Marchena’s first contribution to the game would be to give a penalty away. Ricardo Leon scored and the game ended 1-1, despite Deportivo having the chance to capitalise on a poor performance from the opposition. Defensive changes don’t always solidify the defence; in fact, defensive changes like Vazquez’s usually mean that attacking players scamper around not knowing what their role and duty in the side is. It is almost as though Vazquez switches from an 11 player game to 5, sometimes 6.

One extremely strange thing about Vazquez is that he is a fantastic manager for the level he is managing in but the problem is that he rarely takes risks when they present themselves. To compare him to another manager in Spain, he is almost like Emery. Emery is a wonderful manager but his main flaw, and it is a huge one, is his inability to take risks in order to kill off sides that his team should be beating. He is happy to defend any lead. Vazquez’s problem is similar, yet he sometimes seems happy to defend what he starts off with when the whistle blows for the first time in a game. When Vazquez does take risks, Deportivo play some exciting football and this was highlighted in yesterday’s 2-0 over Recreativo de Huelva. This was the best I had seen Deportivo play all season as Vazquez opted to start the game with no defensive cover in midfield – something which delighted many who were basking under the sun in the beautiful stadium of Riazor. Vazquez played with Juan Dominguez as the sole holding midfielder, yet his role was still one where he operates from deep to link the midfield to the attack rather than sweeping up loose balls or battling to win back possession. Back-heels from loanee Rabello, a few step-overs from Luis Fernandez and some outrageous bits of skill from Sissoko really showed how dangerous this Deportivo side can be without the shackles being cast on their creativity and freedom on the pitch.

The players celebrate after the best performance of the season

The players celebrate after the best performance of the season

If he knows how capable his side are of playing an exciting brand of football and wiping the floor with most teams in the league, why is it that Vazquez has only realised, with seven games to go, that this style of football suits the side better than any of the previous styles? Vazquez plays the “defence” card whenever he is asked why his side never go for the kill and opt for this negative brand of football. Vazquez wins these battles with the journalists because Deportivo are the side who have conceded the least amount of goals in the league, yet Deportivo’s best performances in the league this season have seen them keep two clean-sheets whilst playing some exciting attacking football (0-3 Sabadell, 2-0 Recreativo). The defence play better when the plan is not to focus on them to do the dirty work and hope for a lucky attacking break. Insua himself said that he feels more comfortable pushing the defensive line forward than forcing it closer to his own goalkeeper.

Now, I do not want this article to seem as though I dislike Vazquez because I think he is a very good manager. My qualms with him have already been stated but I would also like to defend some of his decisions and why he does not take risks. When Vazquez arrived at Deportivo last season, with the side rooted to the bottom of the table, the first thing he did was bring Valeron back into the first-team and allow the side to play with freedom and creativity; Deportivo almost achieved the great escape from relegation due to this brand of football but the damage had already prevailed prior to Vazquez’s arrival. This shows that Vazquez is able to take risks and play for the win rather than being comfortable with a draw, ecstatic with a win and seemingly o.k with a loss. But one can understand why Vazquez has taken this approach in the Segunda (second division) this season: he knows that Deportivo do not have the best players in the final third (more applicable before January but point still stands) so focuses on building the core of the side around the defence which is seemingly strong. By doing this, Deportivo are able to slowly climb up the table, getting some points here and there on the road back to stabilising themselves as a club and reaching the first division. Vazquez has always spoken highly of the fans – they have kept the club ashore for the past few seasons despite the sometimes unbearable rocky moments – so it could be said that he does not want to disappoint the fans with poor, yet brave results. The kind of results that annoy you because you were good but conceded a fairly dodgy goal. Vazquez plays it safe and, by doing so, he has put Deportivo in a great position with seven games to go. That cannot be argued against.

I guess the overall point of this is to explain Vazquez’s tactics, give my opinion on them, but also to defend the man who sometimes comes under obscene amounts of scrutiny due to his negative approach to games. Whatever happens this season, I just hope that Vazquez continues to drag the team along to La Liga. From there-on out, if Vazquez continues at the club, he will have to rethink his strategies because the first division can be diabolical if you go into it negatively like Valladolid, Betis and Osasuna have, at some points, this season. Taking risks may come with a few thrashings but it can lead to continuously proving doubters wrong like Paco Jemez’s wonderful Rayo Vallecano side. Whatever Vazquez’s approach may be next season, he has his work cut out: extremely tight budget, the squad will become even thinner as loanees depart and some key players may even opt to jump ship.