Posts Tagged ‘Euro 2016’

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Gameiro celebrates his goal against Molde in the Europa / [Image via Manuel Gomez]

As Kevin Gameiro’s low-shot nestled into the net against Molde, he became the highest goal scorer of all-time for manager Unai Emery, beating out Carlos Bacca and Alváro Negredo in the process. But not only did that goal make him Emery’s highest goal scorer of all-time, it counted for his 19th of the season in all competitions – two more than he amassed over the entirety of last season. The French striker is currently in his finest vein of form, but that wasn’t always the case at Sevilla.

When Gameiro joined Sevilla, his job was to play second fiddle to Bacca. Whether it be operating with the Colombian just to open up space for him, or entering the field of play with 15 minutes to go, it’s fair to say that Gameiro was severely underused and under-appreciated by Sevilla for a long while. He would often narrow their style of play and tread on Bacca’s toes. His game was made up of uncertainty both in movement and in finishing. It would take the 28-year-old several chances before he would bury one. The culmination of the aforementioned drawbacks meant that Gameiro quickly became someone who played in dead-rubber games or when fixtures became congested.

Bacca’s departure may have worried a multitude of Sevilla fans, but it eased the pressure off Gameiro’s shoulders and allowed him to spearhead an attack consistently. When Fernando Llorente arrived on a free transfer from Juventus, there was a small concern that Gameiro would once again find himself on the periphery of the starting 11. In short, that would eventually become something far from the truth.

The French forward appears to have something that the Spanish tend to call autocrítica, which is when you look at yourself in a critical manner and evaluate your weaknesses in order to erase or strengthen them. This is evident in Gameiro’s case because he plays like a changed, more improved player. Whereas before he was treading on the toes of his teammates, he now knows when and where to exploit space. His spacial awareness has increased which, in turn, is reflected in his goal tally this season. Most of his goals have come from supreme movement and commanding of the box.

Something that Bacca improved on when he was at Sevilla was his passing and associative play. A criticism of his was that he often looked for a pass to reach him, rather than go looking for it or involving others. When he altered that negative facet of his game, his popularity in European football rose, granting him a lucrative move to AC Milan. In Gameiro’s case, things are very similar. Gameiro now glides around the final third, looking to receive a pass, and release one of his own, or exploit defensive gaps. In fact, his three league assists were created from navigating of space on his own behalf and inch-perfect passes. By becoming a more well-rounded forward less obsessed with scoring goals, he has found that goal scoring is far more natural when you involve yourself in the bulk of play rather than waiting for scraps. By being on the move more often, Gameiro has scored more goals in a Sevilla shirt than he could have ever predicted.

With the Europa League, Copa del Rey and league still to play for, it wouldn’t be farfetched to predict 25 goals (or more) from the Frenchman this season. 29 goals in all competitions would be a return higher than what Bacca ever produced for Sevilla. To think there was a point where the quality of the two could not have been further apart is astounding and outright banal.

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With Karim Benzema’s national team future facing uncertainty, Didier Deschamps simply cannot afford to ignore Gameiro’s form and improvement as a footballer. He is no longer a player who solely scores goals. He improves and heightens the quality of his team’s play in the final third more so than Olivier Giroud or any other French forward currently active. Antoine Griezmann is his real competition, but that centre-forward role is more of a necessity at Atlético Madrid rather than an indication of where Griezmann’s future for France lies. Therefore, it is inconceivable to even ponder on Gameiro not making that flight for the European Championships. He is the most improved, most productive and hungriest natural centre-forward available to France if Benzema is excluded from the tournament. In fact, aside from Benzema, no other French centre-forward has scored more goals than Gameiro (in club competitions) this season. If France want a footballer who liquifies play in the final third and remains productive, then they must look no further than the 28-year-old. Especially if he ends the season the way everybody is predicting he will.

Gameiro has gone from being an inconsistent, enigmatic striker at Sevilla to a dependable fan favourite. That renaissance is solely down to his own mentality, deciding to improve himself rather than sulk on the bench and accept a bit-part role for the remainder of his contract.