Posts Tagged ‘Sergio Garcia’

It wasn’t too long ago when an Espanyol quartet of Sergio Garcia, Stuani, Verdú and Simão was taking the Catalan club to unbelievable heights. Coached by the brilliant Javier Aguirre, Los Periquitos looked special and seemingly increased in quality. Fast-forward two years and this is no longer.

Sergio-Garcia-010

Sergio Garcia, Verdu and Stuani celebrate in the 2013/14 season. Photograph: Alejandro Garcia/EPA

The club have fallen in every facet: from how it is run by the board to on-pitch performances. There is a disjointedness that circulates the air unlike anything witnessed at Espanyol this decade. An ever present side in the Spanish top-tier since 1994, Espanyol now look like a club that could sink back down to the Spanish Segunda División. 

There has been an amalgamation of issues that have hit Espanyol this season; they stretch beyond the usual “players aren’t good enough” or “manager isn’t good enough” argument. Those two issues are prevalent, sure, but the club’s uncertainty in how it has sold its rights is affecting the fans’ opinion of the club. The new Chinese owners openly admit to knowing very little about football, and their recent celebration of the Chinese New Year just outside the Cornellá El-Prat stadium has sent some fans into unequivocal uproar. A rather large portion of fans believe that the club is being commercialised, and thus a loss of identity is impending. This uncertainty, and gloomy outlook, is making them doubt the club. And in doing that, they doubt the players and manager by extension. It’s a vicious cycle that has completely derailed any notion of squad morale at Espanyol.

CNY

Chinese New Year celebrations outside Cornellá El-Prat

The Chinese owners have gone on record to say that they want Espanyol in the Champions League in three years. While ambition is welcome at Espanyol, it is this precise comment that gives the fans pause; it makes them take a step back and question if the owners really understand the club that they have taken over. Furthermore, it brings back memories of Málaga. Sometimes Champions League football can be a beacon of prestige and money, but pumping all of your finances into reaching the coveted tournament isn’t worth it for the smaller clubs – they need to build their way there rather than taking the shortcut. Málaga learned the hard way and Valencia are more-or-less on their way there. Espanyol don’t want to be victims to this recurring theme in Spain but the owners appear to be completely oblivious to this.

The issues, as explained previously, do not reside with just one sector of Espanyol. As much as the owners have spread uncertainty, the management has been subpar at best and horrendous at worst. Sergio González, sacked ten days before Christmas, was the catalyst to this downward spiral that Los Periquitos have found themselves undergoing. The young coach, despite all of his talents, played with a negative mindset that constantly hindered the team over the course of 90 minutes. Sergio often made defensive substitutions with games poised at 1-1, 0-0 etc. encouraging opposition pressure when the game was even. In fact, there were some games where Espanyol were dominant before the substitution. One example of this was the game with Villarreal in August. With the game tied at 1-1 and looking to go either way, Sergio replaced a striker with a defensive-midfielder in the final 20 minutes. With 3 minutes to go of normal time, Espanyol conceded twice and lost the game 3-1. That is just one isolated incident, amongst many, that contributed to Sergio’s sacking. Despite his talents as a coach, he handicapped the team drastically.

Sergio’s replacement came in the form of Constantin Gâlcă, a former player of the club just like Sergio. The results have been similar. He has had next-to-no glories, garnering just two points in 2016 (worst in La Liga) and guiding Espanyol to within one point from the relegation zone. Gâlcă has been given one last chance with an upcoming game against Valencia, but his words have not filled any Espanyol supporter with hope. In short, Gâlcă wants to change the style of football ahead of this game. It is an act of desperation, a man frantically cycling through ideas to find something that works. Sadly, that represents Espanyol from ownership right down to the players on the pitch. It is feasible that the Catalan club may see three, possibly even four, managers attempt to make something stick from now until the end of the season.

Gâlcă

Constant rotation of the Espanyol defence has contributed to the club conceding 46 goals in 23 league games – joint highest in the league. That is, on average, two goals conceded per game. Centre-back Michaël Ciani, undisputed fourth choice for a while, has recently found himself a regular in the side. He is a player you would likely see at the heart of Espanyol’s defence if they were to be relegated. Right now, though, it is frustrating even as a disconnected neutral to see Gâlcă toy with the defence. He’s trying to make something work, correct an error, but it plays out like that scene in the first Mr Bean film where Rowan Atkinson attempts to wipe the wet Whistler’s Mother painting down only to stain it further. That is Gâlcă’s management in microcosm.

The players, in particular the captains, have recently entered the crosshairs of the fans. Espanyol are well-renowned for their legendary captains who would always work extremely hard, correct the issues of their team-mates and face the media. Most recent examples of this are Raúl Tamudo, Dani Jarque and Sergio García. As of right now, Espanyol have cowardly captains. In the most recent humiliation – 5-0 loss against Real Sociedad at home – captain Javi López and 3rd captain Víctor Álvarez walked straight down the tunnel without apologising, or even acknowledging, the home fans. By doing this, they also avoided any media interview. The only person to step up was 22-year-old Real Madrid loanee, Burgui. The captains are supposed to face the media as representatives of the team and performance on the pitch. Instead, a young loanee had to show his face. That says a lot about the current situation at Espanyol. Nobody knows where to look to for a glimmer of hope or salvation.

Burgui

Burgui showing his face after 5-0 loss, captains nowhere to be seen

Right now, associative play is non-existent at Espanyol. Passes are not being strung together successfully, attacks are almost always gifted to the Catalan club through opposition errors. Despite the big signings of Marco Asensio (loan) and Gerard Moreno in the summer, Espanyol have somewhat regressed in the final third. Asensio’s performance levels have dropped drastically and Moreno has failed to recapture the form he displayed last season at Villarreal. When the attacking stars are failing to consistently produce, and the defence is being tinkered with every game, it is hard for a team to even move without getting hurt. That’s Espanyol.

Espanyol are in free-fall and there’s no telling how long it will take for Los Periquitos to pick themselves back up when they inevitably hit rock bottom. As of right now, no manager or player can save them. Their destiny almost seems predetermined: relegation beckons.

Advertisements